May 21, 2016

balde internals, part 1: Foundations

For those of you that don't know, as I never actually announced the project here, I'm working on a microframework to develop web applications in C since 2013. It is called balde, and I consider its code ready for a formal release now, despite not having all the features I planned for it. Unfortunately its documentation is not good enough yet.

I don't work on it for quite some time, then I don't remember how everything works, and can't write proper documentation. To make this easier, I'm starting a series of posts here in this blog, describing the internals of the framework and the design decisions I made when creating it, so I can remember how it works gradually. Hopefully in the end of the series I'll be able to integrate the posts with the official documentation of the project and release it! \o/

Before the release, users willing to try balde must install it manually from Github or using my Gentoo overlay (package is called net-libs/balde there). The previously released versions are very old and deprecated at this point.

So, I'll start talking about the foundations of the framework. It is based on GLib, that is the base library used by Gtk+ and GNOME applications. balde uses it as an utility library, without implementing classes or relying on advanced features of the library. That's because I plan to migrate away from GLib in the future, reimplementing the required functionality in a BSD-licensed library. I have a list of functions that must be implemented to achieve this objective in the wiki, but this is not something with high priority for now.

Another important foundation of the framework is the template engine. Instead of parsing templates in runtime, balde will parse templates in build time, generating C code, that is compiled into the application binary. The template engine is based on a recursive-descent parser, built with a parsing expression grammar. The grammar is simple enough to be easily extended, and implements most of the features needed by a basic template engine. The template engine is implemented as a binary, that reads the templates and generates the C source files. It is called balde-template-gen and will be the subject of a dedicated post in this series.

A notable deficiency of the template engine is the lack of iterators, like for and while loops. This is a side effect of another basic characteristic of balde: all the data parsed from requests and sent to responses is stored as string into the internal structures, and all the public interfaces follow the same principle. That means that the current architecture does not allow passing a list of items to a template. And that also means that the users must handle type conversions from and to strings, as needed by their applications.

Static files are also converted to C code and compiled into the application binary, but here balde just relies on GLib GResource infrastructure. This is something that should be reworked in the future too. Integrate templates and static resources, implementing a concept of themes, is something that I want to do as soon as possible.

To make it easier for newcomers to get started with balde, it comes with a binary that can create a skeleton project using GNU Autotools, and with basic unit test infrastructure. The binary is called balde-quickstart and will be the subject of a dedicated post here as well.

That's all for now.

In the next post I'll talk about how URL routing works.

balde gentoo

Feb 23, 2016

Working at RedHat and moving to Czech Republic

Warning: this is yet another delayed announcement :-)

I'm happy to announce here that since September 1st of past year I left Titans Group and Joined RedHat, working remotely from Brazil. I'm working as Software Engineer, and I'm a member of the oVirt integration team.

After 3 months working from Brazil, I moved to Brno, Czech Republic. Now I'm working from one of the RedHat offices in the city.

You can expect some posts here about my work, that is mostly open-source now, and about my experiences in Czech Republic.

ovirt personal redhat